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Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Archive for the ‘Biography’ Category

Biarritz

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I know this beach very well.  I very nearly drowned there about 30 years ago.

I think it was probably 1991.  I was still married and my wife, Sharon, and I, with our two boys, Richard and Evan, had driven down to South West France on holiday, staying mainly at campsites.  Evan, who turned 30 last week, was still a baby, in a car seat, and Richard wasn’t more than four or five.  It was a great holiday and we did the same the following year.  The farthest south we ever travelled was San Sebastian and I have vivid memories of us eating lunch in a chaotic restaurant there.

But back to Biarritz and my near death experience. It was my ‘surfing period’ and atop the car was my custom made yellow surfboard, emblazoned, I am sure you will be amused to hear, with a large leaf from a certain favourite plant!

I shall never forget the sea that day.  There was no wind, it was flat calm, like a mill pond, except for massive 10 – 12 foot waves rolling in and pounding the beach with surf.  ‘Glassy’ is the surfing term and until you see it, this combination of calm water and hugely powerful waves is very difficult to understand.

I paddled out and getting beyond the break was impossibly difficult.  When the waves broke there was still a six to eight feet high torrent of white water to get past and trying to duck dive underneath it showed up all my lack of big wave experience.

Eventually I made it but I was absolutely exhausted.  I’ve been a very strong swimmer all my life but that had taken all my energy and then I realised that I was being pulled rapidly out to sea.  The rip current had got me and there was nothing I could do.  I tried everything, paddling parallel to the beach across the current in both directions and coming off the board and trying to swim out towing the board behind me with my leash.  Nothing worked and then came the beginnings of panic.

Since a small boy in South Wales, I had delighted played in big waves, well what I thought were big waves but the power of these Atlantic rollers was like nothing I had ever experienced and the rip current they were creating was like an unstoppable train.  Never before and never since have I been so close to absolute panic, nausea deep in my stomach, helpless, this is it, I thought.  By now. I was beyond the large rock Boris is pointing at in the picture

Then, out from the beach, paddling furiously, came another surfer. He undid his leash, threw it to me and started to tow me back in.  I was just flat out on my board and somehow he managed to get us both back in.  I collapsed on the beach, gasping for air and as I recovered I looked around for my saviour.  He asked if I was OK and I thanked him profusely in my very poor French, he didn’t speak a word of English. Mostly though I was coming to terms with the fact that he just about came up to my shoulder.  He was tiny, almost like a child and then brushing aside my gratitude he sprang back towards the sea, threw himself on his board and paddled out into the maelstrom once again.

My humiliation was total.  I couldn’t believe how one so small had shown me up for the lumbering, clumsy amateur that I was! It took me another half hour to recover from the physical ordeal and mental trauma.  What a lesson learned!  My memories of that day in Biarritz when I nearly drowned will never fade.

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Written by Peter Reynolds

August 25, 2019 at 5:14 pm

Posted in Biography, sport

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Review. Coffee Shot CBD Drops

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If I was asked to design the perfect product for consuming CBD, this would be it.  I’ve found after much experimentation that taking CBD in coffee is the best way for me. I enjoy the taste it gives to a double espresso and I find it works very well.

Equilibrium CBD has developed a special formulation that includes added terpenes selected for an ideal flavour blend with coffee.  Each drop contains 5mg of CBD so it’s easy to add what you want. I use between two and five drops in a double espresso two or three times a day.

Everything about this product has been thought through and worked out in the most effective way possible.  Extracted from organic, low-THC cannabis grown outdoors in Colorado, the oil is winterised and filtered to remove all impurities such as chlorophyll and waxes so that it is a clear, clean, highly refined product, nothing like the dark, acrid oils which can be very unpleasant to taste. It’s then mixed with MCT (medium chain triglycerides) oil derived from coconuts to achieve the required concentration and enhance its ability to be easily absorbed.

I don’t take CBD for any particular medical condition but I’ve found that it does stabilise my mood very well.  This is supported by the science of the endocannabinoid system which shows that CBD acts to prevent the breakdown of anandamide (AEA), the endocannabinoid most closely related to THC, so there’s more of what has been termed ‘the bliss molecule’ naturally present in your system.  It also acts on the serotonin receptor providing a natural anti-anxiety effect.  There are also a host of other long term health benefits to be gained by nourishing your endocannabinoid system as a form of preventative medicine.

Equilibrium Coffee Shot CBD Drops cost £59.95 a bottle. That’s enough for at least 40 cups of coffee at about 70p a time. That’s excellent value for money and for me the perfect CBD solution.

Order Equilibrium Coffee Shot CBD Drops here.

 

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 3, 2019 at 2:59 pm

Letter to the Irish Independent, 22nd June 2019. ‘Let’s look at the evidence when it comes to cannabis’

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Peter Reynolds of CLEAR confronts the reefer madness of Irish psychiatrist, Professor Patricia Casey.

See her original column: ‘Dangers of sleepwalking into legalisation of cannabis use’

In response to Patricia Casey (Dangers of sleepwalking into legalisation of cannabis use’, 15th June 2019), how much longer must we be berated by the sort of arguments that Professor Casey puts forward? At best her column is disingenuous and misleading.

The ‘Cannabis Risk Alliance’ was directly contradicted by another group, similarly qualified, just a few days later and by the overwhelming weight of medical and scientific opinion around the world.

Research shows the risk of mental illness with cannabis is one in 20,000. By comparison the risk of being struck by lightning is one in 3000.

Medical cannabis is not “use of cannabis of the CBD variety”. Bedrocan, the leading EU medical cannabis supplier has three products with THC content of 22%, 13.5% and 14%. It’s clear Professor Casey simply doesn’t understand the subject.

Cannabis has been used as medicine for more than 5,000 years and doctors around the world now prescribe it with enormous benefit to patients. Some 99% of Irish doctors have not been educated in the endocannabinoid system, through which cannabis works. In other countries, medical cannabis has special regulations. Trying to regulate a 500 molecule medicine in the same way as single molecule pharmaceutical product is impossible.

Professor Casey is wrong about the Netherlands. By separating the cannabis market from hard drugs, the rate of heroin addiction is one-sixth that of Ireland. So talk about a ‘slippery slope’ and a “softening up process” is simply mischievous.

I agree that government must be careful of vested interest groups but these include doctors funded by pharmaceutical companies. Psychiatrists only see people with a problem and are blind to the benefits that 99% of people experience.

Can cannabis be misused and cause harm? Yes. Is the risk as great as with alcohol or tobacco? No. Is it any more than with coffee, bacon or chocolate? Not really. It really is time we acted in accordance with the evidence and not on scaremongering which verges on hysteria.

Peter Reynolds

 

 

Written by Peter Reynolds

June 22, 2019 at 4:10 pm

Review. ‘Cannabis Health’ Magazine

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This is a milestone in cannabis law reform.  A glossy magazine, produced to the highest standard, fit to sit alongside Country Life, Cosmopolitan or Vogue.  It treats the subject with intelligence, with insight and the stories it tells are told with respect, sensitivity and common sense.

It would be easy to have made this sensationalist, to have made exaggerated claims, launched strident attacks on those who still oppose consumption of the plant or fallen into the trap of folklore rather than science, magic rather than medicine.  The publishers have hit the bullseye with the right tone and style and provided it reaches the right coffee tables, perhaps doctors waiting rooms, it will help to drive reform. Never before have I been moved by a magazine but this represents the achievement of a level of acceptance that sometimes I doubted I would see in my lifetime.

CLEAR was able to contribute to this first issue, introducing our members, Robert Cohen and Marie Emma Smith, whose stories of how cannabis has transformed their lives are beautifully told and I am honoured to have been interviewed as part of a feature on the campaign.

It’s intended to be quarterly but I won’t be surprised if it takes off and becomes monthly before very long.  There is a huge reservoir of advertising expenditure which has been stymied by the short-sighted attitude of social media companies. It will be poetic justice if traditional publishing can do well out of the reintroduction of this traditional medicine. A free, one year, postal subscription is available to the first 10,000 people to register by emailing chloe@aspectpublishing.co.uk

There is still a logjam of prejudice and lack of understanding, particularly amongst cowardly politicians and a medical establishment that feels threatened by a subject where patients know more than doctors.  ‘Cannabis Health’ wll help to break this down.  The sheer weight of public support, enthusiasm and real life experience will soon leave these sceptics desperate to catch up.  Get yourself a copy and enjoy quality writing about cannabis published in print rather than online.  The world is changing!

Written by Peter Reynolds

June 6, 2019 at 3:31 pm

‘Cannabis Law is Simply Criminal’. Letter to the Sunday Times, 26th May 2019

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The Sunday Times, 26th May 2019

Thank you to the Sunday Times for publishing my letter about cannabis today.

In fact, it was orginally a comment left on this article: ‘CBD products being rated for tax — but still seized’.  I received an email asking for my permission to publish it as a letter which clearly I was happy to agree to.

Obviously I accept that letters will be edited but when this is done to alter very substantially the original meaning, questions have to be asked.

Why is the Sunday Times protecting corrupt, senior British politicians from facts which are in the public domain? In the original the last two paragraphs read:

“Our politicians are incompetent, stupid and in some cases brazenly corrupt on this subject and reform is inevitable, although how long it will take remains to be seen.

While Theresa May and the Home Office drugs minister, Victoria Atkins MP, both continue to make personal financial gain from licensed cannabis production, the UK has a steeper hill to climb than Ireland. Corruption at the very top of government is difficult to overcome.”

Written by Peter Reynolds

May 26, 2019 at 3:49 pm

VIDEO. After 50 Years of Campaigning for Access to Cannabis as Medicine, at last MPs Have Started to Listen

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Sir Mike Penning MP opening the debate on 20th May 2019

For 50 years campaigners have been battering on the doors of Parliament, writing to and meeting their MPs, presenting detailed, cogent arguments backed up with scientific evidence. We have fought. We have argued. We have marched, demonstrated, pleaded, begged and we have been rejected. We have been ignored, abused, ostracised, treated like drug pushers and with contempt by those who are supposed to govern us within a democratic system.

Now at last they are listening. They have opened their eyes and their ears and they finally seem to understand. Of course, now they are all congratulating themselves on ‘their’ efforts and achievements but that is the nature of MPs. We, who have fought this war and see victory in sight will just have to swallow that. History will record the courage and the suffering of those who were in the front line when MPs refused even to speak to us.  Never forget, it is less than two years since a senior cabinet minster told me “the settled view of ministers is that the medicinal campaign is just an excuse to take cannabis”.

Yesterday’s debate in Parliament shows that MPs have finally got the message and we can at last be certain that cannabis will soon be widely and readily available to those who need it.

Watch the debate here.

Written by Peter Reynolds

May 22, 2019 at 4:44 pm

Posted in Biography, Health, Politics

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Presentation at the Hemp CBD Expo, 2nd March 2019

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I spoke at the Hemp CBD Expo at around 5.00pm on Saturday, 2nd March 2019.  Below is my speech as originally composed.  An audio file is available here. A video will be available shortly. My PowerPoint presentation file is here.

“Good afternoon ladies and gentlemen.

My name is Peter Reynolds and I am the president of CLEAR Cannabis Law Reform. We were founded in 1999 and we now have around three-quarters of a million followers on social media and we’re approaching a total of 5,000 paid up members.  That makes us the longest-established cannabis group in the UK and our follower and membership base is several times that of all other UK drugs policy groups put together.

Last year we launched Cannabis Professionals or CannaPro, the trade association for the UK’s cannabis, CBD and hemp businesses.  I am going to explain to you why, what we think we can contribute to this industry and how we are going to do it.

First of all though I have some BREAKING NEWS!

Downing Street has just confirmed that the mastermind behind the FSA’s decision to place CBD products in the EU Novel Food Catalogue is none other than Theresa May’s number one fixer, Chris Grayling!

Now that’s not really true, in fact it’s fake news but there is a kernel of truth in it and that is that just like everything else Grayling touches, this move is the height of incompetence and just as many are calling for Grayling’s blood, so too they will be calling for some accountability at the FSA.

First of all, these are CLEAR’s aims and objectives.

It’s a pleasure to be asked to speak to you today and I do think that this event represents a significant moment in the legal cannabis industry in the UK.

Of course we’ve had a legal cannabis industry for thousands of years.  There was just a brief interlude between 1964 and 1993 when even the cultivation of industrial hemp was banned. So, although there have been severe restrictions on cannabis since 1928, it was actually only those 29 years when there was no legal industry at all.

The CBD business as we know it today started in about 2012 and at CLEAR we saw immediately what it was about. By then, largely due to uptake of the internet, knowledge of the medicinal benefits of cannabis was exploding.  People were looking for a way that they could enjoy these benefits without breaking the law.  The big leap came with the story of Charlotte Figi, when the almost miraculous effect of CBD on epilepsy became widely understood.  It was really in 2013/14 when CBD websites started to appear in numbers. Back in those early days the leading brands were Plus CBD and, of course, Charlotte’s Web. In Europe, Endoca was leading the way.

And now look where we are!  This show is the realisation of a market which no one has really quantified but is certainly worth at least £50 million a year and probably a whole lot more.

At CLEAR we realised very early on that the way this market developed was going to have a huge influence on wider cannabis law reform and that’s why we have been deeply involved with it from the very beginning.  I genuinely believe that the medical reforms last year only happened because the booming CBD market has washed away a lot of the stigma around cannabis and shown hundreds of thousands of people that it does have real therapeutic benefits.

And here we come to one of the most difficult aspects of this business. CBD businesses are not allowed to claim or imply any medicinal benefits from their products yet you can be absolutely certain that is exactly the reason most people are buying them!

I cannot think of another market or a comparable situation where anything like this has happened before.  It is one of the principle reasons why we are facing such opposition from the medical and big business establishment.

I have never been a supporter of the Big Pharma conspiracy theory that pervades the cannabis campaign.  Particularly in the USA, the pharmaceutical industry is thought to be almost entirely responsible for continuing federal prohibition.  In fact if you read Facebook comments from our American followers you’d think that Big Pharma was responsible for nearly every problem on our planet!

Now I don’t say there’s no truth in it at all but there’s precious little evidence aside from the isolated instance of Insys Therapeutics where the former directors are now looking at very long jail sentences for a variety of corruption offences. But there’s not much else to support the theory.  In fact, if Big Pharma could harness the healing power of cannabis that some of the more extreme evangelists claim for it, they’d be all over it.  And no, it’s not true that you can’t patent cannabis, there are hundreds of patents on extracts, applications and techniques.

It is a different world in America though, far more competitive about medicines because they don’t have an NHS.  Unlike here, drug companies advertise direct to the public and branding is as big in medicine as it is in soft drinks or fast food.

However, I do think that the intervention in this industry from the MHRA back in 2016 and now the FSA has some sinister, vested interests behind it. I think major corporations see a potentially huge market here and it would suit them for it to be so heavily regulated that only the biggest businesses can make it work. I also think it’s a pathological obsession of bureaucrats to interfere when something big is happening which they haven’t got their claws into – and I think these regulators are being improperly influenced to interfere when there’s no real justification.

After all, the World Health Organisation has given CBD a clean bill of health, not in the equivocal way that most such decisions are made but absolutely.  It says CBD is safe.

I’ve had a number of meetings with the FSA over the past 12 – 18 months. The most recent being on 1st February about the current novel foods debacle.  One moment stands out from that which is instructive about the way that regulators operate.  The Head of Novel Foods confirmed for me that the purpose of the legislation was to ensure safety of food and food ingredients.  He also confirmed that the FSA has no evidence to suggest that CBD products are unsafe.

It’s bureaucracy for bureaucracy’s sake.  In my opinion, a flagrant waste of taxpayers’ money, that’s our money, when there are so many more important things we could be spending it on.  For me, as a Brexiteer, it’s more reinforcement of the reason I voted leave.  We have more than enough busy body bureaucrats in the UK without more and more layers of it from the EU.  It should be instructive to everybody of the way that civil servants’ minds work that this attack on our industry was made surreptitiously through the EU when we’re supposed to be freeing ourselves of those shackles.

As a wider point, if we’ve got civil servants kicking their heels, desperate to interfere in something new, why don’t they get on with regulating the entire cannabis market properly? The immense damage that the £6 billion criminal market causes in our society is something that really does need intervention.

So, going back to the MHRA’s intervention in the CBD market in 2016. There had been mutterings for some months but it was Dan Culbertson of Love CBD who tipped me off that something was actually happening.

I spoke to some of my key contacts, particularly Tom and Tony of Love Hemp and I approached the MHRA seeking a meeting.  As in most cases like this, its first resort was to try and ignore us but eventually I had the Conservative MP, Crispin Blunt and the neurologist Professor Mike Barnes write to the chief executive.  They were both members of the CLEAR board and that did lead to the MHRA agreeing to meet.

This was the creation of the Cannabis Trades Association. As well as Love Hemp I invited other key contacts to attend the first meeting and then offered the job of running the CTA to an individual who you all know, who at the time Tom, Tony and I were in partnership with as he was supposed to be running a licensed industrial hemp farm for the extraction of CBD oil.

The progress of the MHRA’s intervention followed a path which seems to be strangely repeated in what is now happening with the FSA.  That is, it came in very heavy handed and aggressive to begin with, threatening action which it really didn’t have the authority to implement but then it backed off quite quickly when we stood up to its bullying and demonstrated a professional attitude.  Based on the clinical trials that GW Pharma were conducting with Epidiolex, its cannabidiol medicine, I proposed a maximum daily adult dosage of 200mg as the most important element of an agreement that would enable CBD to continue to be sold as a food supplement.

Now, even to this day, the MHRA has still not confirmed its agreement to this (last they told me was that they are still ‘considerin’g it) but in practice it has accepted it.  Again, this should be instructive to all of us about the way that bureaucrats work.

The other big issue, of course, was about not making medical claims and for the two years that I worked intensively as part of the CTA, we did a good job of bringing responsible businesses into compliance and, largely speaking, we had defeated the MHRA’s attempt to close the industry down.

As many of you will know, I, and indeed Love Hemp, resigned from the CTA in October last year.  Anyone who wants to know why can very easily find out. Just look at my personal website. Suffice to say that we had very grave concerns about issues of dishonesty and unethical conduct.

I’m not going to say any more about that today but I am going to talk about how I believe a trade association should operate.

Now this is not a pitch for members because CannaPro doesn’t have members in the same way as other organisations. It makes no difference to me or to CannaPro if you choose to give large amounts of money to another trade body. We see no necessity to charge large monthly fees for providing a service which directly supports CLEAR’s aims and objectives. As I said at the beginning, we see the development of the legal cannabis market as one of the most important drivers of cannabis law reform.  Only if we can demonstrate that we can run responsible and legally compliant businesses in CBD and exempt products will we be able to claim we can do the same with products that contain THC.

Also, we don’t believe it is desirable for a trade association to make money or turn into a bureaucracy itself.  It’s the businesses that should be making a profit and building resources for themselves. A trade association should not be about empire building, its focus should be on the businesses it is supposed to support, not on itself.

So while I don’t rule out CannaPro ever charging membership fees, for now the only time we ask for money is when we carry out a review of a business’s products, website, marketing methods and trading standards.  This then enables us to offer any necessary advice or guidance on compliance and if we are satisfied to certify the business, so that it can display a CannaPro Certified badge.  We charge a £120 one-off application fee for this and there are no further ongoing charges.

We are already well advanced, working with leading media consultants on putting together a national advertising campaign delivering the same message that we are already doing on social media.  Something like this…

Similarly, CannaPro will always publish all its advice and guidance openly.  We can see no purpose in keeping it secret or operating behind closed doors when our intention is to support the industry as a whole.

We have communicated openly about our recent negotiations with the FSA and we will continue to do so.  If you follow CannaPro we will keep you apprised of the latest developments as they happen and we will not insist you have to become a member and pay fees in order to share in this intelligence.

Another important principle is that CannaPro represents the industry to the authorities and not vice versa. We are not an extension of government, doing its enforcement work at our members’ expense.  It is our job to stand up to meddling, interfering bureaucrats and to push back at them.  We will defend this industry against attack without requiring it to fund a new bureaucracy in its trade association.

For instance, we entirely support the prohibition of medical claims for CBD products.  This is not a new thing and clearly before anyone can claim medical benefits for anything it must be subject to testing and verification.  The alternative is that we will have snake oil, nothing more than coloured water, offered as a cancer cure and to be fair, we have already had almost exactly that in the CBD market.  If any of you have ever come across a joker trading as Sacred Kana, that is exactly what he is doing. Claiming to sell 10,000 mg of CBD for less than fifty quid which will cure you of stage 4 cancer.  He’s an extreme case. There are others operating along the same lines and frankly I do think people like this need strong action against them.  They should go to jail and be permanently restrained from ever running a business.

But the trouble is the MHRA is doing virtually nothing about enforcement. Similarly, the FSA, which declared CBD isolate a novel food over a year ago, is doing nothing about enforcing that.

Really medicines regulation in this country and across the first world is broken, unfit for purpose and entirely self-serving for the pharmaceutical industry.  The process, administered by the MHRA, has been designed for the pharmaceutical industry by people who used to work in the pharmaceutical industry and it is incapable of regulating a plant based medicine.  Everyone involved has a vested interest in prolonging the process and extending its complexity because the millions spent on clinical trials go into companies which are owned by the pharmaceutical industry.

There was a study published in the Journal of Molecular Neurobiology last year which identified CBD as an ideal candidate for a fast-acting, effective anti-depressant with few side effects.  But the reality is that to obtain a marketing authorisation in the UK or the EU or an FDA licence would take many, many years, tens of millions in investment and would result in a much higher price than necessary.  But as it stands that is the only way to develop a medicine that can be prescribed by a medical profession that is so risk averse it has forgotten how to care for patients.  Just since the new regulations on medical cannabis last November I have lost count of the number of reports we have received where a consultant flatly refuses even to consider cannabis but will prescribe opioids in a prescription that can be repeated simply by asking for it.  And the British Paediatric Neurology Association says that using CBD for epilepsy should be the last resort.  Literally they say try brain surgery, slicing into a child’s brain, before trying CBD.

So we have these bureaucracies which are supposed to be acting in the public interest but they’re marking their own homework, ensuring their former and future colleagues benefit from the regulations they impose with fat fees and lucrative contracts and preventing anyone who isn’t part of their club from having any chance of getting a licence for a medicine. They overreach themselves, attempting to set rules and regulations often beyond their lawful authority (the Home Office is a particularly heinous examples of this) and then, when these regulations are breached, they’re not even enforcing the most serious infringements.

An example in point is the question of hemp teas.  Now if these are made from leaf and flower, they are cannabis and they are an illegal, class B drug which theoretically could get any of you selling them 14 years in jail.  But this has never been enforced and CannaPro will certify businesses that sell hemp teas.  We will not certify businesses that sell CBD flowers or buds because these are cannabis and their THC content is irrelevant to their legal status.  Yet there’s no enforcement of this going on.  There are shops in virtually every town in this country openly selling low-THC cannabis flowers and nothing is being done about it.  Now this is wrong.  These businesses are stealing your business when you are doing your best to operate within the law and they should be stopped. Even when cannabis is fully legalised, there will still be regulations that need to be enforced.

Believe it or not, I was contacted by the drugs lead at West Midlands Police just last wek asking for my advice on hemp flowers, so I told him.  I confirmed they are illegal and I explained to him why and how they cannot be classified as exempt in the same way as CBD oil. And what I said to him was the same as I would say to anyone else. If you’re going to break the ridiculous law which prohibits adults accessing cannabis, then my advice is have some THC in your buds. It makes no difference under the law whether your flowers have 0.2% THC or 20% but I know which I prefer.

So it’s about balance. It’s about being sensible. The MHRA says a link to a study about CBD for anxiety is an implied claim of medicinal benefit. Strictly speaking it probably is but provided it’s not part of a concerted attempt to present products as medicines then it would not stop that business being certified by CannaPro.

CannaPro is on the side of the entire industry whether you’re certified by us or not because this industry’s future is the future of cannabis.  We are not exclusive of anyone.  We are inclusive.  You can have our advice and guidance without charge.

And we are in the vanguard of developing CBD medicines.  All the work I do for CLEAR and CannaPro is voluntary.  I get paid nothing for it.  I make my living as a writer and marketing consultant but more and more as an advisor on cannabis product development and licensing.  I am working with clients on the development of products which can be marketed under the new regulations as Cannabis-based Products for Medicinal use – CBPMs. Also on products for which we will apply for a Traditional Herbal Registration – THR and for veterinary CBD products which require a marketing authorisation from the VMD.

As I published when I first created the CTA, the intention was to establish a trade association that would represent to government the interests of those engaged in legitimate production and sale of cannabis products.  Those are the values and the purpose which we carry forward in CannaPro and I look forward to working with a many of you as possible in that cause towards ending forever the prohibition of cannabis.

My real, long term objective is to close down CLEAR.  I look to the day when complete reform of our cannabis laws has been achieved. There will still be regulations as there are in all legal markets but as long as adults have legal access to cannabis in all its forms for both therapeutic use and as an alternative to alcohol as a recreational drug – and the right to grow it, even within limits – then and only then, our work will be done.”