Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Posts Tagged ‘brain

Home Office Backtracks On Cannabis – Part 2

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See the original article here.

The Home Office has been denying to me all week that it had changed its story.  It claimed that it had said “Drugs such as heroin, cocaine and cannabis are extremely harmful and can cause misery to communities across the country.”  It claimed that cannabis was never included in this statement.

Today it finally owned up.  It issued this statement at 5.18pm this evening:

A Home Office spokesperson said:

“There is clear evidence that drugs such as heroin and cocaine are extremely harmful substances.

“There is also clear evidence that cannabis is a harmful drug which can cause both physical and psychological problems. Even the occasional use of cannabis can be dangerous for people with diseases of the circulatory system, and it can contribute to heart disease and lung cancer.

“In this instance there was a drafting error with the original version of this statement, which was subsequently rectified.”

Does It Look Dangerous To You?

Now, I understand and respect the professional efforts of the Home Office PRs to damp down this story.  It just doesn’t wash though does it?

Why did it take nearly two weeks to correct this error?

Why did they try to cover up the error in the first place?

All this from a government department that emphasises how important are its “health and education messages” and that it must not send “the wrong message – to young people in particular.”

Of course, the truth is that the Home Office sends inaccurate and misleading messages about drugs all the time.  Everyone, except the Home Office ministers and mandarins, agrees that the present drug classification system is nonsense, that it amounts to nothing less than misinformation.  In fact, the Home Office is currently less than seven days away from a judicial review of its political manipulation of the Misuse of Drugs Act 1971.  The Drug Equality Alliance co-founder, Casey Hardison, has taken it upon himself to challenge the Home Secretary and the Advisory Council on the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) in the Administrative Court for its irrational, unfair, and possibly illegal exclusion of alcohol and tobacco from control under the Act.

Even David Cameron agrees that ecstasy should not be a class A drug – see here.  The debacle and embarrassing nonsense about the ever-changing classification of cannabis destroyed Alan Johnson’s integrity for good.  Young people have been watching the government’s “messages” for years, comparing them to their own experiences and realising  that the government talks rot when it comes to drugs.  The Home Office is inconsistent, unreliable, contradictory and nothing short of dangerous when it comes to messages about drugs – as they’ve just proved, yet again.

As for the revised statement, there is evidence to show that smoking cannabis can cause the same damage to the cardiovascular system as smoking tobacco, but no one smokes anywhere near the same amount of cannabis as they do tobacco – they’d be asleep!  In fact, the very latest research shows that cannabis has an extraordinary protective effect for tobacco smokers and may actually reduce the likelihood of lung cancer.   Other recent research has also shown cannabinoids to have remarkable effects in shrinking brain, head, neck and breast cancers.

The Home Office is so far out of date it’s difficult to believe.   It still talks sensationally about the dangers of “new stronger strains of cannabis known as skunk”.   The truth is that skunk has been the predominant type of cannabis available in the UK for more than 20 years.  That’s how up to date the Home Office is.   Finally, the “psychological problems” story.  Sure, any psychoactive substance has the potential for harm but increasingly there’s evidence to show cannabinoids actually have an anti-psychotic effect.  One of the most useful applications of medicinal cannabis is in the treatment of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder.

To those who don’t already know the facts, I say simply google your questions.  Even the Home Office, much as it might try, has not yet found a way of silencing the truth.

Cannabis

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God's Herb

God's Herb

I have smoked cannabis since I was 14.  There have been a few breaks, some of a few months, some of a year or two but those apart, I have smoked cannabis every day of my life for nearly 40 years.

I have come to regard weed or hash, in all seriousness, as the Rastafarians do, as “God’s herb”.  It is a sacrament, a truly positive, honourable and precious thing in my life.  Something that I thank God, I did not miss.

I grew up with smokin’ dope.  It was a fundamental part of my adolescent culture with the Rolling Stones, the Grateful Dead, with a heady summer living the love and peace dream in Amsterdam.  LSD blew my mind in those days but a joint was always a sustaining experience.  Something I held onto.

As I grew up and got interested in business, I relished the delicious and maverick escape that I enjoyed.  I took it seriously and wrote a 40 page report for the Home Affairs Committee entitled “An Unaffordable Prejudice”.

The prejudice, misinformation and sheer nonsense has continued throughout my life.  The idiocy of downgrading cannabis to a Class C drug and then, just two years later, back up to Class B is only outdone by the crass stupidity of  failing to decriminalise it completely.  Prohibition has proved time after time to be an ineffective solution.  Worse than that, the law makes a complete ass of itself by sustaining the criminal supply and distribution of a product that is never going to go away.

Regulation is the only viable solution and would provide the framework to care for those very few who may suffer from cannabis use.

What are the dangers?  Clearly any intoxicant offers more potential for harm when used by the young, when the brain is still developing.  Despite my own experience, cannabis use should be for adults only.  In adults it has been proved to be one of the least harmful substances known to man time and time again – despite the fact that most have actually set out to prove the opposite.

Recently the popular argument has been against skunk, a strain of cannabis that can be up to 20 times stronger than that previously known.

To claim this is a recent development is simply wrong.  For at least 20 years it has been difficult to buy anything but skunk and other F1/F2 hybrids of the plant.  There are many others: Northern Lights, Haze, Blueberry, etc.  In my teens it was difficult to buy anything but Lebanese or Moroccan hashish.  In Holland where the market is partly regulated there has always been a wide choice of grass or hash from all parts of the world grown and/or processed in many different ways.

The latest suggestion is that skunk is causing psychoses in adolescents – yet the incidence of psychoses in adolescents has remained constant since records began.  This is just the lastest scaremongering.  60 years ago it was said that cannabis caused young women to be promiscuous with black men.  The standard of the argument has not improved.

It really is time that this hopeless policy against a benign, natural herbal product was stopped.  Hemp is one of the most ecologically friendly, sustainable crops in the world.  As regulated cannabis it would pull the rug from underneath a great swathe of criminality and produce billions in additional tax income.  As biofuel, building materials, fabrics and cattle feed it could help to revitalise agriculture and many other businesses.