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Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Posts Tagged ‘hero

Kevin Vickers, Canada Parliament’s Sergeant-At-Arms, A Genuine Hero.

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Kevin Vickers

Kevin Vickers

It is the critical moment of the attack on the Canadian Parliament. Before any more lives could be taken by gunman Michael Zehaf-Bibeau, he is shot dead by House of Commons Sergeant-at-Arms Kevin Vickers.

Zehaf-Bibeau had exchanged gunshots with parliamentary security at the entrance of Centre Block and ran down the long Hall of Honour towards the doors to the Parliamentary Library.

As he ran down the hall, pursued by RCMP officers, he passed the barricaded doors on his left, behind which the prime minister and the Conservative MPs were meeting. On his right, the doors to another caucus room where NDP MPs were diving for cover.

He shot at both doors, with one bullet penetrating the outer doors to the NDP caucus room.

Zehaf-Bibeau continued down the hall toward the wooden doors of the Library of Parliament, where he lodged himself behind a stone pillar beside an alcove to the right of the library’s entrance.

Vickers’ office is around the corner, a few metres away.

Hearing gunshots, Vickers grabbed his side arm, a semi-automatic pistol, and immediately ran out. His security team, who had been chasing Bibeau, yelled to Vickers that the suspect was hiding in the alcove.

Vickers immediately ran behind the other side of the pillar. That put him an arm’s-length away from Bibeau.

According to guards, Vickers actually could see the barrel of Bibeau’s gun pointing out, a foot away.

Vickers did not hesitate.

In one motion, sources told CBC News he dove to the floor around the pillar, at the feet of Bibeau, turning on his back as he landed and simultaneously firing his weapon upwards at Bibeau.

Bibeau was hit multiple times and fell to the ground. Vickers kept firing, emptying his entire magazine.

As soon as Bibeau dropped, the rest of the security team sprinted forward and opened fire.

Several bullet holes in the walls in the alcove give a sense of the numbers of rounds fired, and many more hit Bibeau.

One bullet passed right through the wooden library doors, hitting the librarians’ desk deep inside.

But no one else was injured in that final exchange of gunfire.

According to sources, Vickers calmly got up after the firing was over and went back to his office to reload his gun in case a threat remained.

He then went to the Conservative caucus room where Prime Minister Stephen Harper and his MPs had barricaded the room’s doors with chairs.

After identifying himself to gain entry to the room, Vickers strode to the microphone at the front of the room and explained what had happened:

“I engaged the suspect and the suspect is deceased”, he said.

According to sources, the entire room erupted in cheers, as Vickers left to continue to secure the grounds.

Source: CBC News

 

 

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Written by Peter Reynolds

October 26, 2014 at 3:00 pm

Vive La Resistance! Palestinian Heroes Fight Back Against The Nazi Israelis.

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french-resistance

When you’re fighting for your life and the lives of your family and compatriots against a  brutal invader then anything is justified.

Israel_Nazi_jewsWe don’t doubt the right, indeed the moral imperative of the French resistance fighters to use any and all means against the Nazis.  The same is true of the brave Palestinians fighting back against the huge evil that is the criminal state of Israel.

We should be parachuting in weapons and supplies to Gaza. Our special forces should be supporting the valiant efforts of the freedom fighters. Netanyahu and his gang of war criminals must be brought to the Hague and put on trial for their crimes.
palestinian rockets

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 13, 2014 at 9:04 am

If I Was Blair I’d Cancel My Donation

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The Times, 21st August 2010

There are plenty of other organisations looking after our heroes and their families who would behave far, far better.  Tony Blair should cancel his donation and give it to a different charity.

Chris Simpkins, the Royal British Legion’s director-general is an ungrateful, ill-mannered oaf.  All he had to do was keep his mouth shut.  He has dishonoured the generous intent behind Blair’s donation and he should be ashamed of himself.  The Times also needs to have its motives examined for running this shabby, despicable story.

Our heroes do not give their lives so that fat cat, small-minded, cowardly administrators and journalists can get their names in the papers.  Shame on them!

I am no blind supporter of Tony Blair.  I said what I thought about the donation just five days ago.  I stand by that.

The Poppy Appeal has been my first choice charity throughout my life.   This appalling, graceless behaviour will make me re-think where my money will go this year.

The World Waits For Mandela

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If Nelson Mandela cannot bring himself to condemn Mugabe this weekend at his birthday celebrations then he will have let us all down.

Although this is a heavy burden to place on any individual, Mandela has established himself as a moral authority and the moral authority in Africa.

We look to you as a hero and one of the few world leaders with inarguable integrity to bring down judgement on the head of this evil man.  State the truth and the world will follow your lead

Written by Peter Reynolds

June 24, 2008 at 10:26 pm

Posted in Politics

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Walking The Dog 2

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In memory of a fallen comrade

Walking The Dog 2

Apart from herons and wealthy, attractive, single women (which seem to be virtually extinct), the main focus of our daily rambles is sticks.

Of course, sticks come in all shapes and sizes but Capone prefers something, shall we say, robust. I suppose the ideal is about four feet long and perhaps three inches thick but the crucial factor in stick style is the way it is carried. It must be held at one end, not in the middle. I think Capone believes this is more flamboyant in the same way the way that a quiff or fringe sweeps back or a fighter pilot’s scarf flies to one side. Of course, even the most perfectly fashioned stick is merely debris on the ground until I have thrown it. Then it becomes the most exciting, the most important thing in life and if it is thrown into the sea he would swim until he sank before giving up the chase.

At the weekend we tackled Thorney Island, all the way around – an eight mile walk in a force eight gale. Out along a one mile dyke, straight as an arrow, then pass through the MOD security gate keeping to the public footpath beyond. The oystercatchers are still here on Thorney although in much smaller numbers but another mile or so on and we put up a roe deer. In the open, not as you usually see them in woods. It ran and Capone ran too but made my heart burst with pride when he responded immediately to the signal, dropped and looked back at me. We watched it run two, three hundred yards inland and continued on our way.

As you approach the most southerly point on Thorney you see to your right the end of Hayling Island and to your left, East Head at the tip of West Wittering. Between is open ocean and a direct line to the Falklands. A couple of months ago when we first made this journey, I spotted an Army Land Rover ahead and we found two men laying the foundations for a bench in memory of a “fallen comrade”. Now, the bench is there. It’s not the usual railway sleeper design. It’s much more elegant and the inscription reads “In memory of Steve Jones, 264 (SAS) Signals Squadron & the crew of ‘Hilton 22’”.

These were our boys, shot down just north of Baghdad three years ago. If I had a son who died a hero in the service of his country, I could think of no more poignant and intense place to remember him amidst the wind, the sea, the sky and the solitude.

Capone and I duly honoured their memory and sat for a cigarette, he accorded the privilege of sitting beside me on the bench for such a special occasion. We remembered them, lachrymose old Welshman that I am.

Thorney turns much warmer and gentler as you move to the east side away from the wind. Nearly seventy years ago, other young heroes took off from here during the Battle of Britain. Now the RAF sailing club provides the local excitement and past Thornham marina and Emsworth harbour back to the mainland.

A pint of beer never tastes better than when you deserve it. So with aching legs and an exhausted dog we made a brief stop at the Bluebell Inn before home for sustenance and sleep.

In the back garden lies a pile of sticks, proudly retrieved, collected and preserved. Out there in the wind and the rain a pile of sticks fashioned into a bench remembers much more than another walk with the dog.

Peter Reynolds 02-04-08