Peter Reynolds

The life and times of Peter Reynolds

Posts Tagged ‘soldier

34 Years Ago, 255 British Soldiers Gave Their Lives For The Principle Of Self-Determination.

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falklands-war

Will You Betray Their Gallantry By Surrendering

That Principle To The EU?

I’m for Brexit and it’s nothing to do with immigration, benefits, the economy, xenophobia or any of the abusive allegations made by the remainers, it’s about fundamental principles of self-determination and democracy.

 

Written by Peter Reynolds

May 4, 2016 at 3:31 pm

The Children Of Palestine Speak Truth To Tyranny.

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children palestine

The children of Palestine are the bravest children the world has ever witnessed.  They defy the soldiers of the zionist occupation regime.  They stand between their brothers and sisters and pointed weapons.  They protect their parents and grandparents. They complain, they argue, they remonstrate, they demand.

They speak truth to Israeli war criminals, spit in their faces and scream in anger.  All too often, they die, in agony, for life, for Palestine.

Written by Peter Reynolds

August 2, 2014 at 6:20 pm

Posted in Politics

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Hamas Is To Israel What The French Resistance Was To The Nazis.

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French Resistance Hero, Georges Blind, Smiles At The Firing Squad.

French Resistance Hero, Georges Blind, Smiles At The Firing Squad.

Hamas is the product of Israel’s conduct. There is no justification or excuse for any of Israel’s actions. They are all undertaken in support of an illegal occupation and in breach of 64 UN resolutions. Israel is an outlaw state. Nothing it does in Gaza is legal. It is the rockets that are self defence and the response of Hamas is as the French Resistance to the Nazi occupation.

Israel_Nazi_jewsIsrael is a country with the most enormous potential yet it has been hijacked by evil.  Just as Germany was subjugated by the Nazis in the 1930s, so Israel is perverted and disgraced by zionists, the new Nazis.

The lives of IDF soldiers are fair game for Hamas.  While individual deaths are tragic, these are soldiers of the Nazionist regime.  Just as ordinary German soldiers had to die in the war against Nazisim, for a greater good, so must ordinary Israeli soldiers.  We cannot hesitate to act in defence of Palestine.  When the Israeli boy or girl soldier is in your sights, the trigger must be pulled. It is the moral and correct choice.

The Nazionist propaganda machine is powerful and effective.  It has duped many Israelis.  It operates furiously worldwide on social media and the internet.  It pushes the lie that Israel aims to avoid civilian casualties.  It endlessly repeats the deception that Hamas is the aggressor when Israel is the criminal, outlaw state engaged in illegal occupation, blockade, genocide, child murder and oppression.

Written by Peter Reynolds

July 30, 2014 at 3:16 pm

Moat’s Last Moments. Are All Our Policemen Wonderful?

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Almost Over

On Friday night they had Raoul Moat cornered at last.  It was the culmination of something more akin to a military invasion than a reasonable response to just one deranged nutter.   Northumbria Police had already made fools of themselves but we were all biting our lips,  not yet protesting, hoping against hope that there would be no further casualties.

The first photographs from the stand-off were released and they clearly showed police pointing tasers.  On BBC News the ex-police firearms expert was interviewed and asked why a taser couldn’t be used to disable Moat.  He answered quite unequivocally that using a taser when a man has a gun pointed at his head was more than likely to result in him firing the weapon involuntarily.

First thing on Saturday morning and it was no surprise to learn that Moat was dead.  What was utterly shocking was to learn that two tasers had been fired and the recording broadcast by the BBC revealed the shouting before the sound of the shotgun blast.  The unavoidable conclusion is that exactly what the firearms expert had predicted was what happened.

I don’t have any sympathy for Moat.  As far as I’m concerned a good case could have been made for him being shot on sight but I am very, very unhappy with the way the police handled the affair.

All Over Now

It may be that the denouement itself was handled properly.  We will never know what really happened however many inquiries we have.  What I am certain of is that overall the police should have done much better.  Those far, far better qualified to judge than me have already said as much.  I speak only as a concerned citizen.

I really worry about our police service.  While I believe there are many brave, honourable coppers, some of whom are highly skilled,  there are too many worrying indications that our police service is not up to the job.

There’s thuggery and the rank-closing covering-up and justification of it.  There’s the appalling canteen culture which is at the root of all the institutionalised racism, thuggery and freemasonry.  There’s the amateurish approach of senior officers who seem barely competent at times.  There is inevitably some corruption but also a long-running deception that the decision to prosecute is at arms length.  The police decide who to investigate in the first place. The CPS and the police eat in the same canteen

Look at the brutality of the police, the TSG in particular, at the Gaza and G20 protests and how they’ve got away with it.  Look at the Inspector Gadget police website for an insight into the disgusting attitude of many officers.   Look at the management of situations like the Cumbrian shootings and the Raoul Moat affair and the use of ludicrous, self-evidently bad ideas like the “kettling” at the Gaza and G20 protests.  Look at the income generation from speed cameras promoted by some chief constables.  Look at the absurd, intrusive, wildly excessive use of CCTV.  Look at the ridiculous administration routines that many chief constables have imposed.  Look at the insistence on retaining the DNA of innocent people.

The police are now very well paid.  A starting police officer gets about twice as much as a starting soldier.   They have wonderful pension arrangements.  They’re also excused, let off and get away with behaviour that should never be allowed.  Look at the thug, Sergeant Delroy Smellie , who repeatedly beat Nicola Fisher at the G20 protest and got away with it, or the officer who assaulted Ian Tomlinson, who later died, and who has still not been charged over a year later.

All the brave, honourable coppers are let down by those bad apples which myopic “support” of the police allows to rot and infect the rest.

The British police service needs a shake up.  It is complacent and inefficient.  Excellent work is done in anti-terrorism and organised crime but the truth is not all our policemen are wonderful.  We need to face up to that truth and make some changes.  Perhaps locally elected police chiefs are a way forward.

The Pacific

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Until more than three-quarters of the way through, I was so, so disappointed in “The Pacific”.  Of course, it had an awful lot to live up to.  “Band Of Brothers”, its forerunner, although produced as  a TV series, has to be one of the very best war movies of all time.  “The Pacific” doesn’t even come close.   That’s not to say that it isn’t excellent in its own right because it is but it isn’t in the same league, battalion or regiment as “Band Of Brothers”.

It’s a ten part series and until epsiode five I was bored.   That’s not just because there’s a lack of action – there is – but there’s also very little characterisation or story.  In “Band Of Brothers” you feel like you’re part of the platoon yourself. You grow to know and love each individual and you experience fear, grief, tension, terror alongside all of them.  It wasn’t until epsiode eight of “The Pacific” when Sergeant Basilone falls in love with Lena, marries her and is then shipped to Iwo Jima that I felt the same searing emotional intensity.  I remember when I first watched “Band Of Brothers”, each epsiode was like experiencing an intense personal tragedy.  I would feel drained, exhausted and traumatised.  It was almost too much but although it finishes well, “The Pacific” is not quite enough.  Perhaps the most moving scene of all is in epsiode nine when Eugene comforts a dying Japanese woman.  This is magnificent film making.

I think war is the ultimate movie genre.  It describes the human condition at the very edge. Like all men, I am fascinated with horror, doubt and uncertainty about how I would behave in combat.  I deplore violent films but when the story requires it, realism is essential.  A war movie should make you understand the reality in detail, explicitly and make you turn away from violence.

My old friend Bruce won an Emmy and a Golden Globe working as a producer on “Band Of Brothers” and I remember talking to him about the sound of gunfire.  He explained the effort involved in achieving a more realistic sound than ever before.  You can hear how in every movie thereafter it’s been picked up and enhanced.

“The Pacific” does take realism even further.  The spray of blood that bursts from a soldier’s body as he is hit, the red mist that appears around a group of soldiers as shrapnel lacerates them is horrifying.  The graphic dismemberment and vile, grotesque injury that nowadays we see soldiers survive is beyond words.  At times the cast is wading through a sea of body parts, of arms, legs, hands, feet.  I think we now accept the shocking reality of this because today we see the survivors of such injury. At last, in the battle for Iwo Jima, “The Pacific” begins to communicate the deeply distressing heroism, the humbling, horrifying courage that these young men, our forefathers, summoned up to free the world from tyranny and allow us to enjoy the freedom that we do today.

There is a real mistake in some of the earlier episodes when many of the scenes are just too dark.  There isn’t even the excuse of it being made for the big screen.  It’s just wrong.  Also some of the CGI, particularly in wide shots of amphibious landings for instance, doesn’t work.  It’s not as convincing as the more primitive, model based effects in “Band Of Brothers”

There is one part of “The Pacific” that deserves the very highest praise.  The titles are quite simply one of the most beautiful things I have ever seen on television or at the cinema.  They consist of extreme close ups of an artist drawing battle scenes with charcoal.  As the charcoal disintegrates into dust and splinters on the page it mixes through to become the detritus of battle, the dirt, dust and shrapnel of combat.  The backgrounds merge with finely textured, laid paper, with live action, graphics and animation.  It really is quite breathtakingly, achingly beautiful.  All the more so so because its subject is precisely the opposite.  The wonderful, haunting theme music is the same as “Band Of Brothers”.  At least that’s the way I hear it.  If it isn’t then it’s been composed to be so similar that they might as well have stuck with the original.

All in all, I did, eventually, greatly enjoy “The Pacific”.  Most of all though it shows just how bloody marvellous  “Band Of Brothers” is.

Fraud, Deceit And Death

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For the second week running a member of the “Question Time” audience, the parent of a serving soldier, has complained that they have had to pay for equipment for their son or daughter to take to Afghanistan.

Our Brave Boys

There can be no greater condemnation of the funding of our troops than this.  In the face of doublespeak and accounting tricks from the government, this is a true insight into reality.

The deception that Gordon Brown is running about defence spending would not pass the most provincial test for petty fraud.  He must be recalled by Chilcot to explain himself.  He must be cross examined, as a hostile witness, as if he had stolen a credit card.

We learn this grubby and sordid truth about our prime minister while our boys bleed to death into the soil of a foreign land.